Preparing to Lead

Dean's Reflections

With America’s economy still struggling to recover from recession, various domestic and international factors have presented challenges to the pace of growth. It remains as important as ever to recognize that U.S. business is one large piece of a global puzzle. The effects of China’s slowing economic growth illustrate the high degree of interdependency the world’s economies have on one another. As I have said many times before, what happens in Beijing affects what happens in Baltimore. This truth supports our position that we must continue to uncover new ways to prepare students to operate in a global economy.

In our homepage feature this month, my colleagues John Burger, Ph.D., professor of economics, and Nancy Williams, Ph.D., associate professor of economics, assess the risks of the Chinese economic slowdown and what it could mean for the United States and the rest of the world. Both have traveled to China with our MBA students and acquired an in-depth understanding of the Chinese situation. While figures point to a slowing Chinese economy on a large level, the phenomenon is not black and white. Those following the Chinese economy need to keep in mind that business news changes rapidly. Reports that are up one day can be down the next. Dr. Burger’s and Dr. William’s studies and discussions of the Chinese economy reinforce the value of continuing to engage with international businesses.

These reasons are among the many why Loyola requires our Executive Fellows and Emerging Leaders MBA students to participate in international field studies in China or an emerging market. Loyola has also included an international business concentration within the Professional’s MBA program for many years. We introduce our graduate students to global economic issues to prepare them for effective business leadership. We are happy to say that we are recognized for our efforts in preparing students to lead in a global economy and that our commitment to international perspectives continues to grow.

If you have any thoughts or would like to discuss this topic, please contact me at sellingerdean@loyola.edu.

Karyl 

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