Thinking Globally

Dean's Reflections

I often use this space to drive the point that businesses must be able to identify trends and have the courage to adapt in order to achieve real sustainability and success. This is especially true when it comes to the globalization of business. As part of Loyola’s Jesuit identity we encourage openness to new discoveries and perspectives, and I believe a commitment from all parties engaged in international pursuits can help achieve their goals for growth by embracing the cultural differences in the global marketplace. And today, every business is global; every business is participating in the world marketplace.

Members of our Sellinger School faculty have drawn attention to a few of the issues companies are faced with when going global. These topics can be applied to any business. Those professors have challenged students to step out of their comfort zones to embrace experiential learning opportunities and consider the important ethical questions raised by globalization. It is important for all business leaders to keep in mind that as we work toward a stronger position in the world for our own organizations, we can also strive to foster global awareness and a sense of solidarity with all cultures.

Globalization has challenged all of us in the business community to plan and develop with a broader view and has opened doors to exciting opportunities. For instance, new international internships and employment options for our students become available every day. One of the firms we are working with in Baltimore operates in 32 countries—in fact, it used to be headquartered in France. Our team is developing a plan where students who are studying abroad will be able to intern in their host county, and follow up with some time in the company’s Baltimore headquarters upon their return to the Sellinger School. Our hope is that these opportunities continue to extend Loyola’s connections throughout the greater Baltimore area, as well as to the broader national and international communities.

As always, if you have any thoughts on this topic, please contact me at sellingerdean@loyola.edu. I’d be very interested in hearing any insights you can lend from your own experiences in working across the rapidly disappearing borders in a globalized economy.

Best wishes for a continued happy and healthy summer, and safe travels on any vacations you may have planned.

Karyl

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