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Loyola to co-host forum on how to prepare new teachers for the classroom

September 5, 2013 | By Nick Alexopulos

Local and national education experts will gather at Loyola University Maryland on Thursday, Sept. 26, for “Ready to Teach: Preparing New Teachers for the Classroom,” the 2013 event in the Leading Minds speaker series presented by the Baltimore Curriculum Project to engage local public education stakeholders in discussions of compelling topics that relate directly to improving K-12 education.

The forum, co-hosted by the Baltimore Curriculum Project and Loyola’s School of Education, will take place from 4:30-6:30 p.m. in McGuire Hall on Loyola’s North Charles Street campus.

The featured panel of experts will explore whether teacher colleges are preparing teachers for the classroom, and discuss the effectiveness of alternative teacher certification programs. The panel will also discuss how K-12 schools and schools of education can ensure that new teachers are prepared and supported as they transition into the classroom.

Panelists include James J. Hennessy, Ph.D, dean of the Fordhman University Graduate School of Education; David M. Steiner, Ph.D., Klara and Larry Silverstein Dean at the Hunter College School of Education; and Kate Walsh, president of the National Council on Teacher Quality. Rachel Mazyck, D.Phil., president of Collegiate Directions and Baltimore Curriculum Project board member will moderate the discussion.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register, visit http://teacherprep.eventbrite.com/.

For more information call Larry Schugam at 410-675-7000, or visit http://www.baltimorecp.org/.

About the Baltimore Curriculum Project:

The Baltimore Curriculum Project is a non-profit organization in East Baltimore that empowers four neighborhood charter schools with the tools they need to help every child succeed. Its mission is to develop, implement, and advocate for an innovative, sustainable, and replicable education model that improves student outcomes.

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