Loyola University Maryland

Department of Psychology

Marianna E. Carlucci, Ph.D.

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Marianna CarlucciAssistant Professor of Psychology
Co-Moderator, Psi Chi
Co-Moderator, LOFO (Loyola Forensic Organization)
Co-Moderator, PURSUE (Psychological Understanding of Research Studies & Undergraduate Experimentation)

Office: Beatty Hall, Room 208
Telephone: 410-617-5282
Email: MECarlucci@loyola.edu

Education:

  • B.A. (Psychology), Florida International University
  • M.S. (Psychology), Florida International University
  • Ph.D. (Psychology), Florida International, University

Scholarly Interests:

Generally, I am interested in the intersection of psychology and the law. Using principles from social and cognitive psychology, I have several lines of research: social eyewitness memory, jury decisions, deception detection, and interrogations. I am also interested in how minorities (gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation) are treated within the legal system. I am currently working with students on projects regarding the juvenile justice system, meditation and micro-expressions and juror perceptions of gender and crime details.

Publications:

Carlucci, M., & Wright. D.B. (In press). Descriptive statistics. In G. M. Breakwell,
     D. B., Wright, J. A., Smith (Eds.). Research Methods in Psychology (4th Edition).
     London: SAGE Publications.

Carlucci, M., & D. B., Wright. (In press). Inferential statistics. In G. M. Breakwell,
     D. B., Wright, J. A., Smith (Eds.). Research Methods in Psychology (4th Edition).
     London: SAGE Publications.

Carol, R. N., Carlucci, M., Eaton, A. A., Wright, D. B. (2013). The power of a
     co-witness: When more power leads to more conformity. Applied Cognitive
     Psychology
, 27, 344-351.

Carlucci, M., Schreiber Compo, N. & Zimmermann, L. (2012). Lie detection during
     high stakes truths and lies. Legal and Criminological Psychology.

Carlucci, M., Kieckhaefer, J. M., Schwartz, S.L., Villalba, D. K. & Wright, D. B. (2011).
      The south beach study: Bystanders’ memories are more malleable. Applied Cognitive
       Psychology
, 25(4), 562-566.

Wright, D.B., Carlucci, M. (2011). The response order effect: People believe the first person
     who remembers an event. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 18(4), 805-812.

Carlucci, M., & Wright. D.B. (In press). Descriptive statistics. In G. M. Breakwell, D. B.,
       Wright, J. A., Smith (Eds.). Research Methods in Psychology (4th Edition). London:
       SAGE Publications. 

Carlucci, M., & D. B., Wright. (In press). Inferential statistics. In G. M. Breakwell, D. B.,
       Wright, J. A., Smith (Eds.). Research Methods in Psychology (4th Edition). London:
       SAGE Publications. 

Charman, S. D., Carlucci, M., Vallano, J., & Hyman Gregory, A. R. (2010). The selective
       cue integration framework: A theory of witness confidence assessment following 
       post-identification feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 16(2),
       204-218.

Charman, S. D., Hyman Gregory, A., & Carlucci, M. (2009). The diagnostic utility of facial
       composites: Beliefs of guilt can bias perceived similarity between composite and
       suspect. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 15(1), 76-90.

Winter, R. J, & Carlucci, M. E. (August, 2009). Ineptitude or strategy? Counsel
       ineffectiveness in capital cases. Judicial notebook, APA Monitor on Psychology,
       40(8), 22.

Wright, D.B., Carlucci, M., Evans, J., & Compo, N.S. (2010). Turning a blind eye to
       double blind line-ups. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 24, 849-867.

Course Offerings:

PY101: Introductory Psychology
PY291: Research Methods I
PY292: Research Methods II
PY658: Applied Techniques in Psychology and Law