Loyola University Maryland

Modern Languages & Literatures

Frequently Asked Questions

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What is the language requirement at Loyola?

All students must complete one course at the 104- or 200- or 300-level in a modern foreign language (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Spanish) or in a classical language (Greek or Latin) at the 124 or 300-level, normally to be completed at Loyola. All students, regardless of major, must fulfill the foreign language core requirement.

May I take some of my core foreign languages at home over the summer?

As is the case for all transfer courses, students seeking to fulfill the core language requirement at other accredited institutions must obtain prior permission from the chair of the department of modern languages and literatures and the Academic Advising Student Center (AASC). Only courses at accredited institutions will be accepted.

Obtain all necessary forms at AASC; AASC will also tell you the kinds of documentation you must provide and will forward your request to the department of modern languages and literatures.

If I take the placement test at Loyola and place above 104, am I done with my language requirement?

No. All students must take at least one core foreign language class. If you place above the 104-level course, you'll need to take a course appropriate to your placement test result.

Do I receive college credit if I place above 104?

If you place above 104 and take 201 to fulfill the core, you will get credit for 104 after you successfully complete 201.

If I have a learning disability, do I have to complete the language requirement?

Yes, all students must complete the language requirement as part of the core. If you have specific needs for assistance, contact the Academic Advising Student Center at 410-617-5050 and show them the required documentation. They will inform you of assistance available. There is no exemption from the language requirement.

If I am a language major or minor, how many courses may I take abroad toward my major or minor?

You may take a maximum of 50% of your major or minor courses abroad (three toward a minor, six toward a major). Also, majors and minors studying abroad must take one 300-level course in the department of the language of the major or minor upon their return to Loyola.  For more information, consult the course catalogue or your departmental advisor.

I'm interested in taking two or three languages. How can I fit these all into my schedule?

Most languages now offer comprehensive introductory language courses that bear the number 161.  You can take the comprehensive 161 course to jump start a second or third modern language.  Or try CCLS, our innovative Comparative Cultures and Literary Studies major and minor. It encourages courses in more than one language and tradition, and includes courses from a variety of departments in the liberal arts. Or, you can have a double major, a split major, or a major in one field and a minor in another. Please consult a Modern Languages and Literature Department advisor for details.

How do I get courses from elsewhere approved?

If the course for which you wish to earn credit does not fall into the above categories, then you must apply to take that course BEFORE taking it. 

  • If the course is a core course, you must make the request through AASC (Academic Advising Student Center); AASC will be able to tell you which documentation you must include and will forward your request to the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.
  • If you're planning on taking the course in a study abroad program, your course will be approved through the international program office.
  • Also note that you must receive a C or better in the course for the credits to transfer; the grades from other colleges and universities do not transfer (unless the course is taken as part of a Loyola program).

Which textbooks do you use for the core courses?

  • Spanish - Nexos for SN 101-103.
  • French - Vis-a-vis for FR 101-103.
  • German - Treffpunkt Deutsch for GR 101-103.
  • Italian - Oggi in Italia for IT 101-103.
  • 104 in all modern foreign languages is a "capstone" course, and texts vary from semester to semester.