Loyola University Maryland

Department of Engineering

Frequently Asked Questions

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Why study engineering at a university like Loyola? 
What engineering degree is offered at Loyola? 
Is Loyola's engineering degree accredited? 
How is the design experience integrated into the curriculum at Loyola? 
What do Loyola engineering graduates do upon graduation?

Why study engineering at a university like Loyola?

Loyola's strong liberal arts core curriculum provides students with invaluable skills needed by all engineers to excel not only in their professional careers, but in all aspects of life. The core offers instruction in such diverse subject areas as writing, history, philosophy, theology, social science and a foreign language. Historical, societal and cultural perspectives are acquired that enhance one's ability to function in a workplace that is becoming increasingly diversified and international in scope. By integrating engineering and liberal arts courses, students are also well prepared to work on complex technical problems that require multi-disciplinary groups to develop effective solutions.

The development of written and oral communication skills is emphasized throughout the curriculum. Thus, students become well equipped to prepare periodic progress and technical summary reports and presentations for the two-semester, capstone senior design course sequence (Engineering Design Project I and II - EG 497 and 498). The total experience provided in the two courses is structured to enable Loyola's engineering students to develop creative solutions to technical problems and to communicate these solutions effectively while engaged in engineering project management. At the same time, they receive regular faculty review and guidance.

Loyola's engineering curriculum contains three non-departmental electives that allow students to pursue additional course work according to their interests. Often, this has led to obtaining a minor in either mathematical or natural sciences. Other students have opted to take courses from The Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., School of Business and Management, giving them additional preparation for the industrial work environment. Still others have chosen electives from an impressive list of upper-level liberal arts courses. Their choices reflect their desires to gain enhanced knowledge in a particular subject area or to improve their skill in public speaking or some type of fine arts, for example.

What engineering degree is offered at Loyola?

The engineering department at Loyola offers the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) degree. Under this program, students can concentrate in either computer engineering, electrical engineering, materials engineering, or mechanical engineering.

Is Loyola's engineering program accredited?

Yes. Loyola’s engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

How is the design experience integrated into the curriculum at Loyola?

Design is presented and coordinated in a sequence of courses that build on each other and demand increasingly sophisticated analysis and design skills of engineering students. Several small-scale activities are assigned to first-year students in Introduction to Engineering (EG 101) or Engineering and Society: Engineering, Design and Creative Problem Solving in the Built World (EG103) to stimulate critical thinking about the design process. Significant design components are contained in several engineering courses taken in the sophomore and junior years. For instance, all computer and electrical engineering students are taught design elements in Electronics I/Lab (EG 432/032) and Digital Logic and Computer Systems/Lab (EG 471/071). All materials engineering and mechanical engineering students are taught design elements in Introduction to Engineering Materials/Lab (EG351/051) and Mechanics of Materials/Lab (EG420/320). Additionally, design issues and experiences are encountered in Experimental Methods (EG390) and Engineering Systems Analysis (EG 441) for all engineering science majors.

In the two-semester capstone course sequence in engineering design (Engineering Design Project I and II -- EG 497 and 498), seniors are responsible for the conceptualization and preparation of a detailed proposal (problem statement with specifications) of a large-scale, open-ended design project in the fall semester followed by its completion and testing/evaluation in the spring semester. As part of the process, alternate design solutions are considered and feasibility analysis is performed. Oral presentations and written reports are required at the end of each semester, and an abstract providing highlights of each project is posted on the department's Web page in the spring. Each student's project area is consistent with his or her discipline and corresponding concentration. The topic and technical basis for the senior design project is derived from the 400-level engineering courses that are taken during the junior and senior years. Engineering courses taken during the sophomore year provide the necessary background and preparation for these upper-level courses. Each student has a faculty advisor who serves as technical consultant. Seniors also receive instruction on a variety of design-related topics, including social relevance and impact, ethics, occupational and public health, safety and environmental protection. These topics are incorporated into design projects where applicable.

What do Loyola engineering graduates do upon graduation?

Some of our graduates attend graduate school full-time while others enter the industry directly. See a list of recent employers or of graduate schools students have attended.